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About MCS

MCS is a mark of quality and demonstrates
compliance to industry standards that companies
strive to meet. It highlights to consumers that
companies are able to consistently install or
manufacture to the highest quality every time.

About MCS

The Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) is an industry-led and nationally recognised quality assurance scheme, supported by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). MCS itself is a BS EN ISO/IEC 17065:2012  Scheme and was launched in 2008. For further information on the history of MCS please download this document.

MCS certifies microgeneration products used to produce electricity and heat from renewable sources. MCS also certifies installation companies to ensure the microgeneration products have been installed and commissioned to the highest standard for the consumer. The certification is based on a set of installer standards and product scheme requirements which are available in the MCS Standards section of this website.

 Search for an MCS Certified Installer here.  Search for an MCS Certified Product here.

MCS covers electricity generating technologies with a capacity of up to 50kW, and heat generating technologies with a capacity of up to 45kW. Currently, MCS covers the following technologies:

An Air Source Heat Pump (ASHP) is a system which absorbs heat from the outside air and turns this into useful heat energy for space heating and domestic hot water. This can be in the form of air to air (providing heated air for space heating) or air to water (providing heated water for space heating and/or domestic hot water).

Please note that heat pump installations commissioned on or after 26/03/2016 must comply with new MCS product requirements aligning the scheme with the Energy related Products Directive. For further information click here.

A Biomass product designed to burn biofuel in order to produce heat for space heating and/or domestic hot water. MCS covers biomass products designed and tested to burn solid biofuels only.

An Exhaust Air Source Heat Pump (EAHP) is a system which absorbs heat from the waste air (or exhaust air) leaving a building. Heat is extracted from the Exhaust air and is upgraded into useful heat energy for space heating and domestic hot water. As heat pumps do not create heat, EAHPs primarily rely on other heat inputs to a building such as heat gains from internal equipment /occupants or from an auxiliary form of heat energy into the building. Therefore they are applicable for very low heat loss applications. A very small proportion of heat is provided by the outside air itself similar to an air source heat pump. This type of heat pump requires a certain air exchange rate to maintain its output power.

Please note that heat pump installations commissioned on or after 26/03/2016 must comply with new MCS product requirements aligning the scheme with the Energy related Products Directive. For further information click here.

A Gas Absorption Heat Pump (GAHP) is a system which use gas to drive the heat transfer process using the partial pressures of two different chemicals at low pressure (rather than an electric driven compressor operating at high pressure which is used in most heat pumps). It requires a gas or LPG supply. In all other senses these systems operate like any other heat pump, absorbing heat from the outside air, ground or water source and turning this into useful heat energy for space heating and domestic hot water. This can be in the form of air to air (providing heated air for space heating) or air to water (providing heated water for space heating and/or domestic hot water).

Please note that heat pump installations commissioned on or after 26/03/2016 must comply with new MCS product requirements aligning the scheme with the Energy related Products Directive. For further information click here.

A Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) is a unit which absorbs heat either directly or indirectly from the ground by extracting & re-injecting water from an aquifer (direct) or by using a ground heat exchanger (in-direct) which is usually a closed loop of pipework buried within the ground (vertically or horizontally) conveying a water/antifreeze mixture as the heat transfer medium .. It upgrades this low temperature heat into useful higher temperature heat energy for space heating and domestic hot water. This can be in the form of ground/water to air (providing heated air for space heating) or ground/air to water (providing heated water for space heating and / or domestic hot water).

Water Source Heat Pumps (WSHP) extract the heat from open water courses such as rivers, lakes and canals and can also extract water from sea water.

Please note that heat pump installations commissioned on or after 26/03/2016 must comply with new MCS product requirements aligning the scheme with the Energy related Products Directive. For further information click here.

Micro Combined Heat and Power (Micro CHP) is a product which can generate heat and electricity simultaneously and from the same energy source. Micro CHP can be heat led (heat is the main output) or electricity led (electricity is the main output). For a heat led unit, a typical ratio is about 6:1 (heat to electricity) for domestic appliances.

Pitched Roof Mounting Kits are used to ensure Solar PV Modules and Solar Collectors are secured when installed on a pitched roof. The mounting kits have been tested for weather tightness, fire spread and wind uplifts.

A Solar Assisted Heat Pump (SAHP) is a system which absorbs atmospheric heat (e.g via an external absorber) and turns this into useful heat energy for domestic hot water. An external absorber acts as an evaporator and utilises the heat in the atmosphere as well as direct solar radiation. Generally the absorber will be placed externally however in some cases may be placed internally. At present MCS only covers SAHPs which provide domestic hot water however it is possible this may change to include space heating in the future.

Please note that heat pump installations commissioned on or after 26/03/2016 must comply with new MCS product requirements aligning the scheme with the Energy related Products Directive. For further information click here.

A Solar Photovoltaic (Solar PV) module absorbs and converts sunlight into electricity using semiconducting materials that exhibit the photovoltaic effect. Solar PV modules are supplied as a sealed unit with a specific voltage and wattage rating. Solar PV modules have to be combined in a system with other components (including an inverter, wiring and roof mounting kit) to provide electricity for a building.

In the absence of formal standards, you are able to find some useful information below about how battery storage can work alongside a solar PV system, whether retro-fitted to an existing installation or fitted as part of a new installation, along with RECC and NSC consumer guidance.

A Solar Thermal collector absorbs sunlight to heat a liquid which can be used for domestic hot water. In some cases Solar Thermal is used for space heating or other uses however it is most often used for domestic hot water.

A Wind Turbine converts kinetic energy from the wind into electrical power. There are two main types of wind turbine; Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) and Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). HAWTs have the main rotor shaft and electrical generator at the top of a tower, and must be pointed into the wind. VAWTs have the main rotor shaft arranged vertically and do not need to be pointed in to the wind to work.

Download the MCS History document here.

Download the MCS Consumer Guide here.

Download the MCS Installer and Manufacturers Guide here.

 

 

How does MCS work?

Independent third party
assessment against
industry standards

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Latest MCS news and
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Frequently asked
questions for consumers
and certified companies

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